Years ago, I joined Epinions and wrote reviews of products I liked. The model was simple – write a review, get paid a little for every pageview and every commissionable sale the review generated. It was a fun little foray into the Internet and getting paid to write about a product seemed fun. Epinions was later acquired by eBay and shuttered in 2014.
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Create a killer course experience: With your course validated and in the works, you need to figure out how people will take it. Most course creators choose to host their courses from their own websites. This way, they get all the value of bringing customers back to their site on a regular basis. I host my own courses from a subdomain on my own site so I can easily add more. The course experience is incredibly important as well. And after trying most of the solutions, I highly recommend Teachable—an online platform designed specifically for courses.
These little jobs are done by people who log on to a company’s site and choose tasks, which could be as simple as clicking a link. Amazon's Mechanical Turk is one of the most well-known sites of this type. Also, there are crowdsourcing projects, which are similar to data entry, where companies engage an army of virtual workers to each do one small part of a larger project.
This is the really fun part when it comes to finding your niche! You get to play around here, and search for niche ideas, which is super-easy with Google’s External Keyword Tool. This is a free tool that allows you to find out both local and global search volumes for certain keywords, related keywords, as well as the competitiveness of those keywords, too.
Fiverr – Fiverr is a huge marketplace where you can sell all kinds of work. From products, like drawings and videos, to services, like a review of your website or resume. Fiverr's differentiator is everything costs just $5 at a baseline, though you can sell add-ons like faster delivery, etc; for more. The marketplace is huge and there's a lot of fun and creative things you can do.
If you have nothing of value to sell from home then retail arbitrage might be a better option for you. Many people partake in arbitrage to earn a little extra money, and for some it has even become their full-time job. Retail arbitrage is the buying of goods at a low price and then selling them on a different platform at a higher price. Sales in shops provide ideal opportunities to pick up products for next to nothing. These can then be sold on eBay or Amazon for higher amounts, making you a nice profit. 

 As for eCommerce, this step takes a little more effort. To get started, you need to learn how to properly source products. I recommend you use a market research platform like Algopix to help you find items that you can actually sell. Once you have a few viable products, you need to contact suppliers, make an order, and start listing your products. While this is a simplified outlook of the process, the fundamentals more or less remain the same.

Today, if you're at all serious about succeeding in any endeavor, whether online or offline, you have to deliver enormous amounts of value. Yes, you have to do the most amount of work for the least initial return. This is especially true online. Why? Because it takes time to build authority and create an audience, two primary ingredients necessary to succeed in the wonderful world of commerce on the web.


Your article has been a great read, especially as someone who has just started seriously blogging. I had a few questions that I wanted to ask you. You write that bloggers should find a niche, and I wonder…how specific does that niche need to be? My blog is a “lifestyle” blog in that it covers fashion, decor, food, and travel. The goal of my blog is to show that people can lead interesting and sophisticated lives by creating luxury through simple comforts in all the related categories I cover. I am very passionate about this idea. There are many blogs like this out there, and I know ultimately it will be my content and voice that set me apart. However, do you think this style blog is unproductive in terms of monetary gains? Is this blog more hobby-geared and going to be impossible for me to ever make a career out of? There are a few very successful blogs like this out there that I know of (such as cupcakesandcashmere.com) that have had tremendous success, but it seems they racked up an audience of readers just through word of mouth (aka social media FB, Twitter, etc), rather than specific techniques like you have outlined. One blog, which is geared towards fashion is just photos of herself in different outfits and has no textual content at all, minus the brand/designers, so I wonder how her blog gained such a huge following?
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